Two students celebrating graduation

According to recent studies, almost one in three of Redwood City’s elementary students worry about getting beat up. Suicide, drug and alcohol abuse, bullying, and homophobia are all top concerns for students at Sequoia High School. Yet, students that have access to support services such as counseling and family assistance programs—and were engaged in after-school programs or other extended learning opportunities—experience more positive overall perceptions of care at school. We are looking to create positive environments for youth by:

  • Building partnerships between youth development organizations
  • Cultivating youth and community leadership
  • Facilitating professional development trainings for practitioners serving youth

Current Activities

Partnerships

  • Redwood City 2020 is facilitating convenings twice a year to identify issues of common concern and to develop action plans.

Leadership

  • Sequoia High School is leveraging their Immigrant Youth Action Team to increase visibility and cultivate resources for immigrant youth in the community.

Professional Development

  • Redwood City 2020 is facilitating development trainings for youth serving practitioners to create, collect and share resources (for more information visit the Alcohol and Prevention page).

Upcoming Event: Sequoia High School Dream Club Dinner

The Making Dreams Come True dinner will be held on Friday, November 17, 2017 at 6pm in the New Gym at Sequoia High School and all proceeds will go to the Dream Club Scholarship Fund. Tickets are available for purchase at the following link and will be available at the door. Please see the flyer for details.

Milestones

  • Compared to last year’s findings, middle school students surveyed in after-school programs reported higher rates of:
  • Feeling cared about in their programs
  • Experiencing a respectful program environment
  • Being challenged with opportunities to deepen their thinking
  • Being given more choices about their activities
  • Being asked about their feelings and ideas
  • 84% of respondents in a 2013 survey at Sequoia High School believed that adults at school recognize their strengths and have high academic expectations.